New Amazon Career Choice Program Pays Up to 95% of Education Costs

Image credit: http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=view&id=580766

Amazon encourages fulfillment center employees to go back to school with their new Career Choice Program.

Amazon announced their new Career Choice Program this week. Amazon wants to help employees at  their fulfillment centers around the country pay for higher education. The program is aimed at Amazon Fulfillment Center employees with a minimum of three years of employment with the company. The remarkable thing about the Career Choice Program is that it does not require employees to study in an area that would further their career at Amazon. Further, it only pays for degree programs in higher demand areas that are known to pay well, like nursing, aviation science, and more. The company will pay, in advance, for up to 95% of the cost of tuition, books, and course fees for eligible fields of study. This is great news for the affected employees and for schools.  In fact, this sort of initiative is why DegreeCast.comexists. A large group of people, some of whom probably thought that higher education was a dream they couldn’t afford, now have funding but no idea where to start looking for eligible programs.

Dear Amazon (and especially you, Jeff Bezos) -

Here at DegreeCast we applaud your bold new Career Choice Program. Not only are you helping your employees better themselves, but you’re helping them in a way that does not necessarily help your bottom line, too.

The program looks amazing, and we would like to be a part of it. Our 100% free to use higher education search engine can help your eligible fulfillment center employees find a school that fits the guidelines of the Career Choice Program, matches their interests and is convenient to them geographically.

DegreeCast.com’s in-depth search details over 10,000 certification and degree programs at more than 240 schools — and that’s just in the states with Amazon fulfillment centers.

We hope you’ll share our URL with your employees.  Even if you don’t, kudos to you for helping your employees fulfill their potential — and not just orders.

Sincerely,

The DegreeCast Team

College Textbook Rental

Last week, we discussed how to keep book costs down, and we heard back from many of you regarding the new trend of college textbook rental. There are several companies which now rent books to students all over the nation, and some individual campus bookstores offer textbook rental as a service to enrolled students.

money jar - image courtesy of Ramberg Media ImagesBut does renting actually save you money? The word from campuses (and blogs) all over the USA indicates that textbook renting is the best way to secure your books at a great price. Reports from students who have used college textbook rentals indicate that an average over 50% was saved per book, resulting an almost unheard-of savings on the bottom line compared to the traditional process of buying a book (either new or used) and then selling it back to the bookstore later at the end of the term.

Here are a few college textbook rental sites to get you started. Don’t forget to check with your campus’s bookstore to see if they offer you a better deal. As always, a quick web search for reviews on any textbook rental site you find could save you a lot of time and headache later:

Chegg.com — Chegg has been in the forefront of the textbook rental market for some time, with rave reviews across the board regarding rental costs and the ease of shipping.

Half.com — Half is an eBay company, but unlike eBay’s auction process, Half serves as a storefront. You can buy immediately instead of waiting for an auction to end, and the payment process is much simpler than the one eBay delivers. Half now has a textbook rental program to offer users.

eCampus.com — With enticing offers like discount codes, no shipping on orders over a certain dollar amount, and a lack of membership fee, eCampus is breaking away from the pack and reviews indicate some students are getting their best deals here.

CENGAGEbrain.com — If you get a copy of your syllabus early enough, there’s a good chance CENGAGEbrain.com could save you even more money with their Book Chapter Rental service. (Have you ever bought or rented a book for a class, then discovered the professor will only be using Chapters 2, 6, and 14? What a waste!)

What sites have you used, and how did you feel about your experience with them? Let us know in the comments!

High Book Costs: Leaves of Gold?

A stack of books

Learn how to maintain low costs as your book count climbs higher and higher.

Worth Their Weight In Gold (Almost)

The costs associated with a degree can be overwhelming on paper. Tuition is not cheap, and campus housing can be expensive. Once you’ve managed to pay for both of these it seems you’re slapped with hefty book costs. Unfortunately, many grants, scholarships, and loans don’t cover this additional expenditure.

College books are expensive, some topping $200 or more apiece and some yearly bills rising to over $1,000. The reasons for the high cost-per-book are varied, but there are ways to make your final book and materials bill more manageable.

One Man’s Trash

Buying used college books is one solution. Campus bookstores cater to the cost-cutters, and many feature large displays of used books in use for the current semester.

You can save between 20% and 30%, depending on the store. Look around for other bookstores around campus or town. Sometimes an unofficial college bookstore four blocks from campus can yield better savings on used books.

Shhhh!

Libraries have saved more than one student a bundle of cash. As soon as a course’s recommended books list is published, call or view online every library in your area and reserve a copy as soon as possible. Librarians are excellent book scouts — they will be able to help you navigate the often complicated inter-library loan systems to help you locate the book you need, and they love doing it. Don’t be shy about asking them for help if you discover your local system doesn’t have the book. Libraries all over the US are networked, and if the book doesn’t show in your area, a good librarian can loan it from a different system for you. Librarians love a good challenge. Let them help!

Click It

Better bargains for both new and used books sometimes come from listings on websites such as Craig’s List or Campusbooks.com. There’s also regular online bookstores like Amazon or BooksAMillion. Before buying, be sure you have the current recommended version of the book the course instructor has listed.

Borrow, Baby, Borrow!

Borrowing a book from someone who just finished the course is a great idea, although it comes with a few caveats. First, the original purchaser may not want you to mark the book up with your own notes, since they’re probably going to want to resell the book later. Be aware that sometimes the word “borrow” really means “rent,” and be prepared to offer them a percentage of the book’s original cost.

Borrowing from a current student of the course can be a sticky wicket. It’s a clear fact that you’re both going to want the book at the same time to prepare for tests and exams. It’s not a good solution, overall, and you should avoid it if you can.

Opinions?

To summarize, learn to love a bargain. Be innovative in searching out sites and shops which can help you find the best deals on books, and don’t be afraid to ask librarians and students for help.

If you’ve found a site or method that works for you, let us know it the comments! We’re in the business of helping you get a clear picture of what kinds of commitments your degree will demand, and this includes giving you information on the best ways to manage the financial aspect.